REVISED: 10/12/08

Douglas D through Z

SEE ALSO McDonnell-Douglas

  Douglas D-558-1 (Douglas)

D-558-1 Skystreak 1947 = Research. 1pClwM rg; ff: 3/15(?>4/15)(?>5/28)/47 (p: Gene May). POP: 3, one of which set a world speed record of 640.74 mph on 8/20/47 (p: USN Cdr Turner Caldwell).
D-558-2 Skyrocket 1948 = Research. 1pCmwM rg; ff: 2/4/48 (p: John Martin). Set speed record of 1328 mph on 11/20/53 (p: Scott Crossfield). POP: 6 [NACA 140/145].
  Douglas DA-1 Ambassador [X7281] (Douglas via E J Young coll)

DA-1 Ambassador 1928 = 2pOhwM; 220hp Wright J-5B; span: 35'0" length: 22'6" load: 780# v: 140/105/50 ceiling: 14,500'. Parasol wing. POP: 1 prototype [X7281], ordered by Ambassador Airways (TX), crash-landed on delivery flight and was never rebuilt.
DAM-1 SEE M-1.
DB-1 SEE B-18.
DB-2 1937 = B-18 airframe—the last aircraft in the B-18 contract—fitted with power nose turret and a large bombardier enclosure designed for XB-19. POP: 1 [37-34].
DB-7 SEE A-20.
  Douglas DC-1 [X223Y] (TWA coll)
  Douglas DC-1 [X223Y] (Douglas)

DC-1 1933 (ATC 2-460) = 14pClwM rg; two 710hp Wright Cyclone; span: 85'0" length: 58'0". Fred Herman, Edmund T Allen, Arthur Raymond, Leland Atwood; ff: 7/1/33 (Carl A Cover). POP: 1 [X223Y] to TWA, then to Howard Hughes in 1936, then to England and France; finally destroyed in a crash in Spain 1940. (2-460) for 700hp P&W Hornet SDG.
  Douglas DC-2 [NC19340] (art: K O Eckland)
  Douglas DC-2A NAR racer [NC1000]

DC-2, -2A 1934 (ATC 540, 555, 570, 2-495, 2-507) = 16pClwM rg; two 710hp Wright Cyclone, and others; span: 85'0" length: 62'0" load: 6190# v: 213/200/60 range: 1200. Arthur Raymond, E F Burton. $65,000; POP: 193, of which 21 to USAAC as C-32 and -33, YC-34, C-39, -41 and -42, and 5 to USN as R2D. Additionally, 5 were built under license in Japan by Nakajima—which in WW2 even rated their own US military code name, Tess—and 1 was impressed by RAF during WW2 for use in India. Subsequent dash-numbers and letters indicated newer versions under (555 570). (2-495) for 700hp P&W Hornet SDG; (2-507) for 690hp Bristol Pegasus. One stock airliner was entered by KLM in the great 1934 London-Melbourne race. Although carrying three paying passengers over KLM's longer airline route and battling a severe thunderstorm near Canberra which wiped out their radio, caused them to become lost, and required a forced night landing in a field at Albury, where the ship became mired in mud and required the help of 300 locals to haul it to solid ground for a take-off, it still managed to place second [PHAJU] overall and first in the handicap category.
  Douglas DC-3 (William T Larkins)

DC-3 1935 (ATC 618, 619, 635, 669) = 24pClwM rg; two 900hp Wright Cyclone R-1820 (1200hp P&W R-1830 as DC-3A); span: 95'0" length: 64'6" load: 8700# v: 230/207/65 range: 1260; ff as prototype DST: 12/17/35. $100,000±, $124,000 in 1952; POP: 455 (?>775), plus 10,147 to USAAF as C-41, -47 through -53, -68, -84, and -117, and USN as R4D. Subsequent dash-numbers and letters indicated newer versions under (619, 635, 669). Awarded the Collier Trophy 1936, "The Plane That Changed the World" was legendary in both civil and military roles, as well as for incredible endurance—about 1,000 were still in commercial use worldwide in 1995. A classic example was one used by Provincetown-Boston Airways that was still flying passengers in the '90s with more than 88,000 hours in its logs, the highest-time airliner in the world [N136PB]. Loadability? A C-47, rescuing Burmese refugees during WW2, set a record of hauling 72 passengers and, on landing in Calcutta, four more were discovered hiding in the baggage compartment! A National Preservation Honor Award, the first ever for an aircraft, was presented to Delta Air Lines in 2001 for its restored 1940 DC-3 [NC28341], their first DC-3 to carry passengers, in service 1940-58.
  Carvair ATL-98 [N5459M] SEE sidebar enclosed

DC-4 Skymaster 1942 (ATC 762) = 44-57pClwM rg; four 1150hp P&W R-2000 Twin Hornet; span: 117'6" length: 93'10" load: 12,866# v: 275/244/76 range: 3000; ff: (as C-54) 2/14/42 (p: Carl Cover). $340,000± POP: 80, plus 1,162 to USAAF/USN as C-54/R5D. Postwar conversions had 1450hp R-2000s; load: 30,890# v: 280/239/80 range: 4200. Planned USAAF 9p bomber version prototype was considered too expensive and was ever built. For a variant of interest, click the guppylike British Carvair ATL-98.
DC-4M North Star (Canada) 1946 = Canadair production of 51p DC-4/C-54 with four 1760hp R-R Merlin 622 inlines for a significant gain in speed, as well as cabin noise; span: 117'6" length: 94'9"load: 29,500# v: 353/325/x range: 420 ceiling: 36,000'; ff: 7/15/46. Crew of 7 and either 44 passengers or 11,500# cargo. Served both RCAF and several civil airlines. POP: 24, c/ns 17500/17523.

  Douglas DC-4E [NC18100] (Douglas)
  Douglas DC-4E [NC18100] (Clark Scott)

DC-4E 1938 (ATC 2-551) = 47pClwM rg; four 1150hp P&W Twin Hornet; span: 138'3" length: 97'7" load: 20,000#. The "E" indicated initial experimental status. Arthur Raymond, Ed Burton; ff: 6/7/38 (p: Carl Cover). At the time the world's largest landplane, development of which was partially funded by five air line companies. POP: 1 triple-tail prototype, first went to UAL [NX/NC18100], then was sold to Japan as an executive transport, which unsubstantiated and perhaps folkloric reports claim crashed into Tokyo Bay on its first flight there.
  Douglas DC-5 [NC21701, PJ-AIW] (Douglas)
  Douglas DC-5 C-110 prototype (Douglas)

DC-5 1939 (ATC 727) = 19-25pChwM rg; two 900hp Wright GR-1820-F62 Cyclone; span: 78'0" length: 60'2" (?>62'2" ?>62'6") load: 6325# v: 231/202/70 range: 1150 (?>1600) ceiling: 23,700'; ff: 4/17/39 (?>2/20/39) (p: Carl Cover). Leo Devlin, Ed Heinemann, et al. POP: 12, of which 3 to USAAF as C-110, 7 to USN/USMC as R3D, 4 to KLM [PJADA/ADB, PJAIW, PJAIZ]; only one [NC21701] served in civil aviation for Boeing Corp, but it, too, was impressed by USN in 1942 [08005]. One option seen in drawings, but apparently never developed, offered four inverted 600hp Ranger SGV-770s.
  Douglas DC-6 Prototype [NX90809] (Douglas Co)

DC-6 1946 (ATC 781) = 48-86pClwM rg; four 2100hp P&W R-2800; span: 117'6" length: 100'7" load: 45,049# v: 362/318/88 range: 3350. Pressurized civil evolution of USAF C-54; ff as XC-118A: 2/15/46 (p: Ben O Howard); ff as DC-6: 7/29/46. $720,000+; POP: 705, of which 166 to USN as R6D, and 175 converted to DC-6B.
  Douglas DC-6B (Douglas Co)

DC-6B 1951 (ATC 6A4) = 44-89pClwM; four 2400hp P&W R-2800; span: 117'6" length: 105'7" v: 323/284/x range: 4000­5530. $995,000; POP: 175.

  Douglas DC-7 [N303AA] (American Airlines)

DC-7 1953 - 64-95pClwM rg; four 3250hp Wright turbo-compound R-3350; span: 117'6" length: 108'11" v: 412/358/122 range: 3565; ff: 5/18/53. Developed from DC-6.
  Douglas DC-7B [N700] (Douglas)

DC-7B 195? = Larger fuel tanks.

  Douglas DC-7C [N731PA] (Pan American Airways)
DC-7C 195? = Larger and longer. 3400hp R-3350; span: 127'6" length: 112'3" load: 70,850# v: 405/357/116 range: 4080.

DC-7D - Proposed turboprop version, not built.


  Douglas DC-8 (Douglas)
  Douglas DC-8 NASA flying laboratory (NASA/Dryden)

DC-8 - Commercial airliner, jet successor to DC-7. ClwM rg; four 11000# P&W JT3C/JT4A for domestic service, Rolls-Royce Conway for intercontinental; span: 139'9" length: 150'6" load: (domestic) 142,302# (intercontinental) 179,461# v: 560-595/500-535/116 range: 4680-5880; ff: 5/30/58 (p: A G Heimerdinger). Ed Burton, Art Raymond, et al.
DC-8-11 1958 = 11200# P&W JT3C-6; load: 39,100#. Take-off wt: 265,000#.

DC-8-12 19?? = 10200# P&W JT3C-10. Take-off wt: 273,000#. Wing leading-edge modified to include slots inboard of each pylon. Slots were covered in cruise flight.

DC-8-20, -8-21 19?? = 15800# P&W JT4A-3 and load: 38,000#, otherwise same as DC-8-12. Take-off wt: 276,000#.

DC-8-30 19?? = Same as -8-21, but 16800# P&W JT4A-9/-10. Take-off wt: 300,000#.

DC-8-32 19?? = Same as -8-21; load: 42,500#. Take-off wt: 155 tons. Flap linkages modified to allow 1.5 degrees of droop in cruise to improve performance.

DC-8-33 19?? = 17500# P&W JT4A-11/-12.

DC-8-40, -8-41 19?? = 17500# Rolls-Royce Conway-12.

DC-8-42 19?? = Same as -8-41. Take-off wt: 315,000#.

  Douglas DC-8-43 [C-FCPF] (Larry DiRicco)

DC-8-43 19?? = Same as -8-41, but four 17500# Conway-12; load: 43,105#. Introduced 4-percent wing leading-edge extension, to increase performance. Slots also increased in size. New leading edge retrofitted to previous production models.

  Douglas DC-8-50 Spectacular 1976 Bicentennial paint job [N1776P] (William T Larkins)

DC-8-50, -8-51 1960 = P&W JT3D-1/-3 turbofans; ff: 12/20/0 [N8008D]. Take-off wt: 276,000#. Aft cabin bulkhead relocated to increase passenger seating.

DC-8-52 196? = Same as -8-51.

DC-8-53 196? = 18,000# P&W JT3D-3B turbofans. First commercial airliner to exceed the speed of sound, during a brief dive in Apr 1962 [N9608Z].

DC-8-54F 196? = Freighter version of -8-53 with large forward fuselage cargo door.

DC-8-55 196? = Same as -8-53, but JT3D-1/-3; take-off wt: 325000#.

DC-8-55F 196? = Freighter version.
DC-8-61 1966 = Same as -8-55, but fuselage stretched 36'8"; ff: 3/14/66. Airborne Express modified some to have -62/-63 pylons and nacelles. POP: 88.

DC-8-62 1966 = Same as -8-55, but fuselage stretched 6'8", new engine nacelles and pylons, wingspan increased to 148'5"; ff: 8/29/66. Take-off wt: 350,000#. POP: 67.

DC-8-63 1966 = 19,000# P&W JT3D-7. Fuselage stretched 36'8" compared to -55. Take-off wt: 177.5 tons! Same wing, pylons, and nacelles as -8-62. POP: 108.

DC-8-71 1981 (McDonnell Douglas) = -8-61 repowered with four CFM56-1 by Cammacorp. POP: 53.

DC-8-72 1981 = -8-62 repowered as previous. POP: 7.

DC-8-73 1982 = -8-63 repowered as previous. POP: 50.

DC-8-8X = Various design studies involving stretches, some with P&W JT8Ds. Also studies of -6X and -7X airframes repowered with two GE CF6-80C2s. No production.


  Douglas DC-9 (Douglas)

DC-9 - Commercial jet airliner. 90-172pClwM rg; two JT8D. POP total: 1,077 by Nov 1983.
DC-9-10 1965 = 90p with 14000# JT8D; span: 89'5" length: 104'5" load: 41,500# v: 575/495/x range: 1670.

DC-9-20 1968 (McDonnell Douglas) = Intended for short runways. 15000# JT8D; span: 93'5" length: 104'5" load: 47,350#.

Douglas DC-9-30 (Douglas)
DC-9-30 1966 = 115p with 14000-16000# JT8D; span: 93'5" length: 119'5". SEE ALSO McDonnell-Douglas C-9.

DC-9-40 1967 (McDonnell Douglas) = 125p high-capacity, short-range version with 14500-15500# JT8D; span: 93'52" length: 125'7" load: 54,850#.

DC-9-50 1974 (McDonnell Douglas) = 139p with 16000# JT8D; span: 93'5" length: 133'7" load: 56,000#.

DC-9-80 1979 (McDonnell Douglas) = 172p with 18500# JT8D; span: 107'11" length: 147'10". Aka Super 80 and MD-80.

Douglas DC-9F [N932F] (Douglas)
DC-9F 19?? = No data.


  McDonnell Douglas DC-10 (Douglas)

DC-10 (McDonnell Douglas) - Commercial jet airliner. 208-380pClwM rg; three turbojet engines; ff: 8/29/70.
DC-10-10 1970 = Optimized for US domestic operations. 40000# GE CF6; span: 155'4" length: 181'5" load: 194,600# v: 589/574/x range: 2300. POP: 138.

DC-10-20 1972 = Prototype for DC-10-40. POP: 1 [N141US].

DC-10-30 1972 = Intercontinental version with 51000# CF6; span: 165'4" length: 181'7" load: 289,500# range: 4,690. POP: 194.

DC-10-40 19xx = 50000# P&W JT9D; span: 165'4" length: 182'3" load: 289,200# range: 4075. POP: 42.


  Douglas DF-151 (Douglas via E J Young coll)

DF 1936 = 35pChwMFb; two 1000hp Wright SGR-1820; span: 95'0" length: 24'6" load: 11,185# v: 178/160/60 range: 2700. Retracting wing floats. Convertible to a 16-berth sleeper. POP: 4, originally designed with PAA in mind, but when no interest was expressed, two went to Japan Air Lines in 1936 as DF-151 [JANES, JANET], and were reportedly dismantled by Kawanishi for engineering data, which showed up in their Navy H8K. In 1937 the other two went to Russia as DF-195 for service with Aeroflot until 1940.
  Douglas Dolphin [NC14240] (Douglas)
  Douglas Dolphin 1 Special Wilmington-Catalina Airlines with triple tails [NC967Y] (Eugene Palmer coll)

Dolphin 1931 (ATC 422, 432 505, 506, 2-366, 2-479, 2-482, 2-483, 2-486, 2-487) = 8pChwMAm; two 300hp Wright J-6; span: 60'0" length: 42'6" load: 2590# v: 141/115/62 range: 450-525. $35,000. All-metal, semi-monocoque fuselage had five water-tight bays; wood-framed wing was covered with plywood; metal-clad empennage had fabric movable surfaces. This basic Donald Douglas design, adapted from USN PD-1, was a gamble that paid off, primarily because of military interest, at a time when the Depression was causing failures and production cutbacks throughout the aviation industry. POP: 24 to Army as C-21, -26 and -29; 23 to USN/USCG as RD-1 and -2; 11 commercial, 1 to Argentina. All generally had the same configurations and measurements—data and performances varied in no less than 17 customizations and motor installations during the series' life. One USN RD-2 [9347] earned a place in history as being the first US presidential aircraft, for Franklin D Roosevelt, in 1933. (505) and (506) were for 3 RD-2s in 1933; (2-479 2-486 2-487) were for 1934 modifications. As for those in civil registry, prototype [X145W], known first as Sinbad (or Model 1), evolved as the first Dolphin under (422), and went to USCG as RD-1. Three others under the same ATC were [NC967Y, NC12212, NC12243], the first two of which were converted under (2-366) as 10p Dolphin 1 Special for Wilmington-Catalina Airline, where they and [NC14204] rang up an enviable record of ten years' service amounting to nearly 40,000 channel crossings with no accidents. [NC12243], with two 435hp Wright R-975, ended up as a USCG RD. (432) was for a 6p with two 300hp P&W Wasp Jr for auto manufacturer Powel Crosley Jr (aka Model 3) [NC982Y]. French industrialist Armand Esders purchased [NC14203=FANJT], fitted with two 550hp Wasp S1. [NC14205] went to the competition as a personal transport for William Boeing and was christened Rover. [NC14286], with 450hp Wasp HB, went to Standard Oil Co, ending up in Australia and the RAAF during WW2 (the Catalina Island [NC14204] also somehow ended up in the RAAF, as well). Two were customized for the Vanderbilt family, most likely under (2-482/-483) [NC14201, NC14208]. Unregistered, the two omega ships were bought by PAA in 1934 for use by their subsidiary China National Aviation Corp.
DOS = DWC as "Douglas Observation Seaplane." SEE O-5.
  Douglas DST [NC28325] (Douglas)

DST 1935 (ATC 607) = 14-21pClwM rg; two 850hp Wright SGR-1820-G2 Cyclones; span: 95'0" length: 64'6" load: 8250# v: 212/184/65 range: 1250; ff: 12/17/35 (p: Carl Cover, Fred Collbohm, Ed Stinemann)—32 years to the day after the Wright first flight. Prototype of DC-3 in 14p sleeper configuration [X/NC14988]. Several dash-number powerplant variants. POP: 21.
DST-A 1937 (ATC 647, 671) = Sleeper version of DC-3. 17pClwM rg; two 900hp P&W Twin Wasp SB; span: 95'0" length: 64'6" load: 8700# v: 215/195/67 range: 1240. Several dash-number power-plant variants. POP: 19. Repowered with 1050hp Twin Wasp under (671).
DT (Davis-Douglas) - Torpedo bomber. 2pOB or OBF; 420hp Liberty 12; span: 50'0 (landplane) length: 34'2" load: 2765# v: 101/x/45 range: 292 ceiling: 7800' (seaplane) length: 37'8" load: 3395# v: 99 range: 274 ceiling: 7400'. Derived from Cloudster, it was Douglas' initial military plane. Army version was O-5.
  Douglas DT-1 [A-6031] (Douglas)
  Douglas DT-1 on floats [A-6031] (Eugene Palmer coll)

DT-1 1921 = POP: 3 [A6031/6033], of which the last 2 were modified as -2 with radiators moved from fuselage sides to its nose.

  Douglas DT-2 (USN & Dan Shomaker)

DT-2 1924 = Land and twin-pontoon sea versions. POP: 39 [A6405/6422, A6563/6580, A6582] and 2 conversions from DW-1 [A6032/A6033], plus license-built: 11 by Dayton-Wright [A6085/6095], 20 by by L-W-F [A6583/6602], and 6 by NAF [A6423/6428].

DT-2B, -2C 1925 = 2pOB; 400hp Liberty 12; span: 50'0" length: 37'8". Civil version for export to Norway, along with license to manufacture additional models. POP: 1 as DT-2B, 7 as DT-2C.

DTB 1925 = 4 exports to Peru.

DT-4 192? = Export model with 525hp Wright T-2; load: 2765# v: 107/x/53 range: 240. POP: 3.

DT-202 - Planned 6p light transport verion of Northrop A-17A c.1938. Not built.
  Douglas DWC Noted as "Plane #3, Lt Erik Nelson" (K O Eckland coll)
  Douglas DWC USAFM restoration (USAF Museum)

DWC, Douglas World Cruiser 1924 = USAC. 2pOB with interchangeable land and float undercarriages. 425hp Liberty 12; span: 50'0" (landplane) length: 35'6" load: 2620# v: 103 range: 2200 ceiling: 10,000' (seaplane) length: 39'0" load: 2615# v: 100 range: 1650 ceiling: 7,000'. Fuel: 644 gallons. POP: 5 [23-1210, -1229/1232]. Evolved from DT-2 for the first successful round-the-world flight 4/4-9/28/24. Departing Sand Point WA, four DWCs christened Seattle (Maj Frederick L Martin, SSgt Alva L Harvey) [23-1229], Chicago (Lt Lowell Smith, Lt Leslie Arnold) [23-1230], Boston (Lt Leigh Wade, SSgt Henry H Ogden) [23-1231], and New Orleans (Lt Erik Nelson, Lt John Harding) [23-1232] made it to Alaska, but Seattle crashed in a fog, and its crew underwent an arduous 10-day trek to Port Moller. Westward bound, the others flew to Alaska, Japan, Hong Kong, Thailand, India, the Middle East, Europe, and London. Leaving on the Atlantic leg, Boston's fuel pump failed and it was forced down at sea. The crew was rescued by a US cruiser, but in towing the plane to shore, heavy seas capsized it and it was lost. The last two finally made it back to the US via Iceland, Greenland, and Nova Scotia (where they were joined by Wade and Ogden in [23-1210] as Boston II) to receive a hero's welcome in Washington DC. The final leg to Seattle officially ended an epic that covered 28,945 miles in 371h:07m, at an average speed of 78 mph.
F-3 SEE A-20.
F-18 SEE McDonnell-Douglas F-18.
F-24 SEE A-24.
  McDonnell XF2H-1 (McDonnell)

F2D-1 1947 = POP: 3 XF2D-1 [99858/99860], redesignated on completion of assembly as prototypical McDonnell XF2H-1 Banshee.
F3D, F-10 Skyknight 1948 = 2pCmwM rg; 3250# Westinghouse J34; ff: 3/22/48. POP: 3 prototypes as XF3D-1 [121457/121459], redesignated as F-10 in 1962.
  Douglas F3D-1 (Douglas)

F3D-1 1950 = POP: 28 [123741/123768].

  Douglas F3D-2 (Douglas)

F3D-2 1951 = Air conditioning, wing spoilers, new auto-pilot; two 3400# J34; span: 50'0" length: 45'5" POP: 237 for USMC [124595/124664, 125783/125882, 127019/127085].


  Douglas F4D (Douglas)

F4D Skyray - USN carrier fighter. 1pCmwM rg; 14500# P&W J57; span: 33'6" length: 45'8" v: Mach 1.05 range: 1200. Redesignated as F-6A in 1962. Withdrawn from service in 1964.
XF4D-1 1951 = Prototype with Allison J35, replaced by Westinghouse XJ40 with afterburners; ff: 1/23/51. POP: 2 [124586/124587], the second of which set a world speed record of 753mph on 10/3/53.

F4D-1 1954 = Production model; ff: 6/5/54. POP: 419 [130740/130750, 134744/134973, 139030/139207].


  Douglas XF5D-1 (NASA Dryden)
  Douglas XF5D-1 (McDonnell Douglas)

F5D Skylancer 1956 = USN research. 1pClwM; 10200# P&W J57; span: 33'6" length: 53'10" load: 7000# v: 990/637/x range: 1335. Evolved from F4D. POP: 4 as XF5D-1 [139208/139209, 142349/142350]. All four were eventually used by NASA for airflow research. One was fitted with wings of modified ogee planform.
F6D, XF6D-1 Missileer - 1961 3pCmwM rg design project for a twin-turbofan carrier-based launcher of XAAM-N-10 Eagle long-range air-to-air missiles. Deemed not cost-effective and none was built.
  Douglas XFD-1 [9223] (USN via William T Larkins coll)

FD 1934 = Last of the fixed-gear biplane fighters. 2pOB; 700hp P&W XR-1535-64; span: 31'6" length: 25'4" v: 200 ceiling: 22,000'. POP: 1 as XFD-1 [9223].
  Douglas FP-2B (TKnL coll)

FP-1, -2 1932 = Temporary US Treasury Dept designations for C-21 (FP-1), C-26 (as FP-2/-2A), and C-26A (as FP-2B) when loaned by USAAC to Border Patrol during Prohibition. POP: uncertain, about 12.
JD - USN general-utility version of A-26.
XJD-1 1945 = POP: 2 prototypes transferred from USAF A-26B [44-34217=57990] and -26C [44-34567=57991].

  Douglas JD-1 (Douglas)

JD-1 1945 = POP: 150 transferred A-26Cs [77139/77224, 80621/80622, 140326/140377]. Became USAF UB-26J in 1962.

JD-1D 1962 = Drone director conversion. Became USAF DB-26J in 1962.

  Douglas DAM-1 prototype (Douglas via E J Young coll)

M-1, DAM-1 1925 = 1pOB; 400hp Liberty 12; span: 39'8" length: 29'3" load: 1870# v: 140/118/54 range: 650-700; ff: 7/6/25 (p: Eric Springer). Mail plane with underside radiator; derived from O-2. POP: 1 as DAM-1 ("Douglas Air Mail"), damaged in field testing, repaired, and redesignated M-1 for delivery to Western Air Express.
  Douglas M-2 [C150] (Frank Rezich coll)

M-2 1926 (ATC 5) = M-1 with nose radiator; length: 28'11" load: 1942# v: 145/118/55 range: 650 ceiling: 17,000'. POP: 6, all to Western Air Express. Some modified with three cockpits for passenger flights.
  Douglas M-3 (Douglas via E J Young coll)
  Douglas M-3M-4 1931 NAT instrument trainer [NR1060]

M-3 1926 = 1pOB; 400hp Liberty 12; span: 39'8" length: 29'7". Mail carrier with data similar to M-1. POP: 10, all to USPO.
   Pilots' complaints about fumes and sparks from the short exhaust stacks on M-2 led to lengthened stacks on M-3. However, these in turn were the cause of many burned elbows, so stacks on M-4 were bent downward, and all M models were eventually modified to this final configuration (— Edward J Young 8/5/98).
  Douglas M-4 [NC1475] (Frank Rezich coll)

M-4, -4A, -4S 1926 (ATC 6, 2-45) = USPO version of O-2 was the "large-wing" model to carry greater loads from small fields. 1-3pOB; 400hp Liberty 12; span: 44'6" length: 28'11" load: 1455# v: 142/110/57 range: 700 ceiling: 16,500'. POP: 40 M-4, of which 1 each was modified in 1927 as M-4A with 425hp Liberty 12A, and M-4S with 525hp P&W Hornet A under (2-45) [C7163]. At least 3 to Western Air Express c.1927 [C1512, C1745/1746].
M-5 - Construction began, but project was canceled soon afterward.
MD-95 SEE Boeing 717.
MO-2BS SEE O-2.
NO-1, -2 - Projects, as XNO-1 and -2, cancelled.
O-2 - 2pOB; 435hp Liberty V-1650-1; span: 39'8" length: 29'6 load: 1680# v: 127. SEE ALSO Thomas-Morse O-6.
XO-2 1923 = Prototype tested with two different wing sizes (36'3" and 39'8"). POP: 2 [23-1251, -1254], the latter with 510hp Packard 1A-155 for evaluation, ultimately rejected.

O-2 1924 = Initial production. POP: 43 [25-335/379], plus 1 converted to XA-2 [25-380].

O-2A 1925 = Night-flying equipment. POP: 20 [25-387/404, -408/409].

  Douglas O-2B/MO-2BS Two- and three-cockpit mods [C60] (Douglas via E J Young coll)

O-2B 1925 = Dual controls. POP: 6 [25-381/386].

O-2BS, MO-2BS 1926 = 2pOBF; 400hp Liberty 12. Twin cockpits. POP: 1 civil version built for James D McKee. It was the first single-engine airplane to span Canada in a 3,000-mile flight at an average 85mph, 9/11-19/26 (p: McKee). Modified as 5p MO-2BS by Douglas in 1927 with three cockpits, and 410hp P&W Wasp; pilot sat behind the motor, passengers in two cockpits behind the cargo bay. Used by the Canadian government as a high-altitude photo-surveyor [C60=C236=GCYZG].
O-2C 1926 = Revised radiator above propshaft. POP: 45 [25-405, 26-001/014, -386/417].

O-2D 1927 = POP: 2 [26-419/420].

O-2E 1927 = Redesigned tail. POP: 1 [26-418].

O-2F, -2G - Cancelled.

  Douglas O-2H Early tall-tail version
  Douglas O-2H Revised short tail

O-2H 1928 = New design with staggered wings, new radiator, redesigned tail and landing gear. 435hp Liberty V-1650-1; length: 30'0" load: 1667# v: 134/107/x range: 512. POP: 71 [27-288/297, 28-128/187, -349/358, 29-158/178].

O-2J 1928 = Unarmed VIP transport. POP: 2 [27-127, -188].

  Douglas O-2K/BT-1 (Gene Palmer coll)

O-2K 1929 = Dual controls. POP: 40 [29-179/208, -210/218], all converted to BT-1.

  Douglas O-2M [606[ (TKnL coll)

O-2M 1930 = Similar to O-32A. 2pOB; 525hp P&W Hornet A; span: 39'8" length: 29'6" load: 680# v: 126. POP: 12 to Mexico.

  Douglas O-2MC-2 (USAAF)
  Douglas O-2MC-3 (Dan Shumaker coll)

O-2MC 1930 = O-2M exports to China. POP: total 10 as O-2MC with uncowled Hornet A, 20 as O-2MC-2 with ring cowl, 5 as O-2MC-3 with 575hp P&W Hornet B1, 12 as O-2MC-5 with 420hp P&W Wasp C1, 22 as O-2MC-6 with 575hp R-1820-E, and 1 as O-2MC-10 with 670hp Wright R-1820-F21.

  Douglas O-5 (TKnL coll)

O-5, DOS 1924 = 2pOB; 425hp Liberty 12. Observation version of DWC with similar specs, first designated DOS, then O-5. POP: 6 [24-2/7].
  Douglas O-7 [25-409]
  Douglas O-9 New 4-blade prop [25-405] (TKnL coll)

O-7, -9 1925 = O-2 with Packard 1A-1500. POP: 1 each [25-409] and [25-405] respectively, both later converted back to O-2.
  Douglas O-8 (Dan Shumaker coll)

O-8 1925 = O-2 with 400hp Wright R-1454 radial. POP: 1 [25-408].
O-14 1928 = Smaller version of O-2H with a swept-back upper wing, and 220hp Wright J-5; span: 30'1". POP: 1 civil prototype as XO-14 for Army evaluation [X13753], became [28-194] upon acceptance.
  Douglas O-22 (Clark Scott)

O-22 1929 = Same as O-2H, but with 450hp P&W R-1340 and swept-back upper wing. POP: 3 [29-371/373], the last of which was modified to O-34.
O-25 1930 = O-2H with 600hp Curtiss V-1570 and redesigned nose. POP: 1 as O-25 [30-160], later became XO-25A.
  Douglas O-25A (John Diele & TKnL colls)

O-25A 1931 = Production model. POP: 49 [30-161/195, -357/370].

  Douglas O-25B (Leslie Burgess colls)

O-25B 1931 = Converted O-29A with dual controls. POP: 3 [30-161/163].

  Douglas O-25C [32-194] (Clark Scott)

O-25C 1932 = Prestone cooling. POP: 29 [32-181/210].


  Douglas O-29 [29-218] (Gene Palmer and TKnl colls)

O-29 1929 = O-2K repowered with 525hp Wright R-1750. POP: 2 as O-29/Y10-29 [29-184, -218].
  Douglas XO-31 [30-229] (Gene Palmer and TKnl colls)

O-31 1930 = 2pChwM; 675hp Curtiss GIV-1570-FM (?>600hp Curtiss V-1570-25); span: 45'8" length: 33'10" v: 190/168/x ceiling: 22,700'; ff: 190/168/30. Corrugated dural-wrapped fuselage, metal-frame fabric-covered gull wings. POP: 1 as XO-31 [30-229]. Design evolved into O-43 and -46.
YO-31 1930 = XO-31 sister ship, but with 600hp Curtiss V-1570-7. 3" longer cowling, and a two-blade, dextrorotatory prop. POP: 1 [30-230].

  Douglas YO-31A (TKnL coll)

Y1O-31A, O-31A 1931 = New wings and tail, wheel pants; three-blade prop. POP: 5 [31-604/608]. Became O-31A.

  Douglas YO-31B [30-231]

YO-31B 1931 = Modified tail with fuselage fairing. POP: 1 [30-231].

  Douglas YO-31C [31-608] (William T Larkins coll)

YO-31C 1931 = POP: 1 conversion from Y1O-31A [31-608].

Y1O-31C 1931 = POP: 5 [31-291/295]. Modified with parasol wings and new tail to become O-43.


O-32 - 2pOB; 450hp PW R-1340. All were converted to BT-2 and -2A with engine cowlings.
O-32 1930 = Modified from O-2K. POP: 1.

  Douglas O-32A (Gene Palmer coll)

O-32A 1931 = POP: 30 [30-196/225], plus 12 to Mexico as O-2M.


O-34 1929 = O-22 refitted with 600hp Curtiss V-1570. POP: 1 [29-373].
O-35 - 3pOhwM; two 600hp Curtiss GIV-1570C (aka V-1570-29); span: 65'3" length: 46'7" v: 132. Gull-winged origin of B-7, originally designated YOLR-35 ("LR" for "Long Range"). All were diverted as air mail carriers during the first half of 1924.
XO-35 1931 = Corrugated fuselage and tail skin. POP: 1 [30-227].

  Douglas Y1O-35 (Dan Shumaker coll)

Y1O-35 1932 = 650hp V-1570-39 or 675hp -53;. POP: 5 [32-315/319]. Redesignated as O-35.


O-36 1931 = 3pOhwM; data similar to O-35; two Curtiss V-1570C (aka V-1570-27), corrugated skin. POP: 1 as XO-36, redesignated as XB-7 [30-228].
  Douglas O-38 California National Guard [31-374] (USAAF)
  Douglas O-38 Gunner (NASA)

O-38 1931 = USAAC observation. Similar to O-29 and O-32, these were the last of the Douglas observations. 2pOB; 525hp P&W R-1690; span: 40'0" length: 32'0" load: 1030# v: 149/128/x range: 325 ceiling: 19,750'. $12,000; POP: 46 [30-407/419, 31-349/379, -406/407].
O-38A 1932 = Similar to O-2J. POP: 1 modified from O-38 [30-407].

  Douglas O-38B (Gene Palmer coll)

O-38B 1932 = Initial production. POP: 63 [31-409/438, 32-102/116, -325/342].

O-38C 1933 = POP: 1 [32-394], transferred to USCG.

O-38D 1933 = Revised design with full cowling, canopied cockpits, new gear and tail. POP: 1 [33-001].

  Douglas O-38E CANG [33-4] (William T Larkins)
  Douglas O-38E in USSR with warning label (Eric Blocher coll)

O-38E 1934 = Second production model. POP: 37 to Air Natl Guard [33-002/016, 34-001/022].

  Douglas O-38F (Gene Palmer coll)
  Douglas O-38F Restoration (USAF Museum)

O-38F 1934 = Minor improvements. POP: 8 to USAAC and Natl Guard [33-322/329].


  Douglas Y1O-43 (TKnL coll)
  Douglas O-43A (Leslie Burgess coll)

O-43 1934 = O-31 with new tail and parasol wing. 675hp Curtiss V-1570-59; span: 45'8" length: 33'11" load: 1165# v: 190/163/x ceiling: 22,400'. POP: 1 prototype as Y1O-43, 24 production models as O-43A [33-268/291].
O-44 - Interim redesignation from B-11 to YOA-5.
O-46 - O-43 repowered with 725hp P&W R-1535-7. Fuselage shape between cockpit and tail modified as on O-31B.
XO-46 1935 = Prototype. POP: 1 [33-291] converted from O-43A.

  Douglas O-46A (USAF Museum)

O-46A 1935 = Production. POP: 90 [35-161/231, 36-128/144].


O-48 - Proposed evolution of XO-46 was never made.
O-53 - Proposed observation variant of A-20B. Production order for 1,489 cancelled in 1941.
  Douglas XO2D-1 [9412] (USN via W T Larkins coll)
  Douglas XO2D-1 [9412] (National Archives)

O2D 1934 = USN catapult observation plane for battleships. 2pCBF; 550hp P&W R-1340; span: 36'0" length: 32'0" load: 1650# v: 162 range: 800. Single pontoon. POP: 1 as XO2D-1 [9412].
OA-3, -4 SEE C-21, -26.
  Douglas YOA-5 [33-17]

OA-5 1935 = Army SAR amphibian redesignated from O-44/B-11; 5pCmwMAm; two 525hp P&W R-1690-11, later 930hp Wright R-1820-45; span: 89'9" length: 69'9" load: 5962# v: 161/152/75 ceiling: 18,900'. Began life as 1933 mock-up B-11 bomber design, redesignated O-44 in 1933. POP: 1 prototype YOA-5 [33-17]. USN version P3D.
  Douglas OD-1 (USMC)

OD 1929 = O-2C acquired by USMC. POP: 2 as OD-1 [A7203/7204].
OH-8 Defender (McDonnell-Douglas) 1988 = USN armed H-6 from civil MD500/530. First designated AH-6F.
P-48 (Model 312) 1939 - Fighter project to fit Ranger SGV-770 and three-blade prop, cancelled from lack of government funding.
P-70 Nighthawk 1942 = A-20 conversion to night fighter with two 1600hp Wright R-2600-11; span: 61'4" length: 47'7" load: 5233# v: 329/270/x range: 1060. Solid nose with radar, and ventral gun-bay with four 20mm cannon. POP: 1 prototype and 59 conversions.
  Douglas XP-70 [39-736]

XP-70 1942 = The first A-20 [39-735] converted to prototype night fighter with radar nose, ventral gun pack.

P-70A-1 1943 = A-20C converted with six added nose guns in addition to radar; 1600hp Wright R-2600-23. POP: 39.

P-70A-2 1943 = A-20G conversion. POP: 65.
P-70B-1 1943 = A-20G with two blister gun packs on fuselage sides. POP: 1.
P-70B-2 1944 = A-20G and -20J converted to trainer. POP: 105.

P2D - 1930 redesignation of T2D-1.
P3D - 5pChwMFb; two 825hp Wright R-1830-58; span: 95'0" length: 69'10" v: 161 ceiling: 15,000'. All metal. Concurrent Army version was YOA-5.
  Douglas P3D-1 [9613] (TKnL coll)

P3D-1 1935 = POP: 1 prototype [9613].

  Douglas XP3D-2 [9613] (Douglas)

XP3D-2 1936 = Two 850hp R-1830-64; length: 69'7" v: 184 ceiling: 19,300'. POP: 1 conversion from P3D-1.


  Douglas PD-1 [A-7979] (TKnL coll)

PD 1929 = Coast patrol and trainer. 3pOB; two 525hp Wright R-1750A, later 575hp R-1820-64; span: 72'10" length: 49'2" load: 6669# v: 114/94/x range: 1309 ceiling: 10,900'. Production of Naval Aircraft Factory PN-10 and -12. POP: 25 as PD-1.
  Douglas R2D-1 (clip via John K Lewis)
  Douglas R2D-1 (USN)

R2D 1934 = Civil DC-2 purchased by USN. POP: 5 as R2D-1 [9620/9622, 9993/9994].
R3D - USN/USMC version of civil DC-5 with two 1110hp Wright R-1820-G102A. ALSO SEE C-110.
R3D-1 1941 = POP: 3 [1901/1903].

  Douglas R3D-2 (clip: 1943 Air Trails)

R3D-2 1941 = USMC. POP: 4 [1904/1907].

R3D-3 1942 = POP: 1 impressed DC-5 [NC21701=08005].


R4D - DC-3 in Navy uniform.
  Douglas R4D-1 (USN)

R4D-1 1940 = Cargo carriers with 1200hp P&W R-1830-92. POP: 66 [3131/3143, 4692/4708, 01648/01649, 01977/01990, 05051/05072] and 40 from USAAF contract [12393/12404, 30147, 37660/37685, 91104].

R4D-2 1941 = POP: 2 DC-3s impressed by USN during manufacture to serve as staff ad VIP transports [4707/4708]. Redesignated later as R4D-2F and -2Z

R4D-3 1942 = USAAF C-53C transferred to USN. POP: 20 [05073/05084, 06992/06999].

  Douglas R4D-4 (USN)

R4D-4 1942 = PanAm DC-3As impressed by USN during manufacture. POP: 10 [07000/07003, 33815/33820]. Some modified with electronic countermeasure equipment as R4D-4Q.

R4D-4B 194? = DC-3s impressed as USN staff transports. POP: 7 [33615/33621].
  Douglas R4D-5 To USAAF [42-93105]

R4D-5 194? = USAAF C-47As transferred to USN. POP: 238 [12405/12446, 17092/17248, 39057/39095]. Redesignated C-47H in 1962.
R4D-5E = Special electronic ops.

R4D-5L = Antarctic and Artic service. As LC-47H in 1962,

R4D-5Q =Radar countermeasures. As EC-47H in 1962,

R4D-5R = Personnel transport. As TC-47H in 1962,

R4D-5S = Air-sea warfare training. As SC-47H in 1962,

R4D-5T = Navigator training.

R4D-5Z = Staff and VIP transport. As VC-47H in 1962,

  Douglas R4D-6 [50781] (USN)
  Douglas R4D-6L with retracting skis [17274] (USN)

R4D-6 194? = C-47Bs transferred to USN. POP: 157 [17249/17291, 39096/39109, 50740/50839], with 7 modifications similar to R4D-5. Redesignated C-47J in 1962.

R4D-7 194? = USAAF TC-47B trainers to USN. POP: 44 [39099, 39101/39108, 99824/99849, 99851, 99853/99857] Became TC-47K in 1962.

  Douglas R4D-8 Converted from R4D-6 [17253], ex-USAAF [43-48367] (Larry DiRicco)

R4D-8 194? = Total of 100 R4D-5 and -6 converted to Super DC-3 configuration with 1535hp R-1820, modified wings, and redesigned tail surfaces. Became C-117D in 1962.


R5D - USN transfers of USAAF C-54.
  Douglas R5D 'Blue Angels' hack (Larry DiRicco)

R5D-1 1942 = C-54A. POP: 56 [39137, 39139, 39141/39181, 50840/50849, 57988/57989, 91105]. Redesignated as R5D-1F and -1Z, then VC-54N in 1962.

  Douglas R5D-2 [90394] (USN)

R5D-2 1943 = C-54B. POP: 30 [50850/50868, 90385/90395]. Last batch of 11 redesignated as R5D-2F and -2Z, then VC-54P in 1962.

  Douglas R5D-3 [50873] (USN)

R5D-3 1944 = C-54D. POP: 86 [50869/50878, 56484/56549, 87754/87759, 91994/92003]. A few redesignated as R5D-3V and -3Z staff transports, then VC-54Q in 1962.

R5D-4 1944 = C-54E. POP: 36 [39112-39128, 90396/90415]. Redesignated VC-54R as personnel transport, then EC-54U in 1962.

R5D-5 1945 = C-54G, most to USCG. POP: 13. Some redesignated VC-54S and -54T in 1962.

R5D-6 - C-54J. Contract cancelled at the Armistice.


  Douglas R6D-1 (USN)

R6D-1 195? - USN version of DC-6A as transport as part of MATS, with similar specs and data. POP: 66.
RD - USN/USCG versions of civil Dolphin with similar data. Army version C-21/-26, OA-3/-4.
Dolphin 1931 = POP: 1 [V106].

XRD-1 1932 = POP: 1 to USN as VIP transport [A8876].

  Douglas RD-1 Dolphin [V-109] (USCG)
  Douglas RD-1 Dolphin [V-109] (Douglas)

RD-1 1934 = POP: 1 to USCG [128=V109].

  Douglas RD-2 Dolphin USN (Gene Palmer coll)

RD-2 1936 = POP: 3 to USN [9347/9349]; 1 to USCG [129=V111].

  Douglas RD-3 [9530] (Dan Shumaker coll)

RD-3 1937 = POP: 6 [9528/9533].

  Douglas RD-4 Dolphin [132] (USCG)

RD-4 1936 = POP: 10 to USCG [125/134].


Ryan-Douglas SEE Ryan.
  This is NOT a real SBD!

SBD Dauntless - USN 2pClwM dive bomber, developed as such by Douglas after taking over Northrop's XBT-1 project. USAAF version A-24.
XSBD-1 1939 = Converted from Northrop XBT-2 USN bomber, not to be confused with Douglas BT-2 USAAC basic trainer. POP: 1 [0627].

  Douglas SBD-1 (USMC)
  Douglas SBD-1P (NACA)

SBD-1 1940 = 2pClwM rg; 1000hp Wright R-1820-32; span: 41'6" length: 32'2" load: 3887# v: 253/142/x range: 1165 ceiling: 29,600'. $37,000; POP: 57 [1596/1631, 1735/1755].

  Douglas SBD-2

SBD-2 1940 = Armorplate added, observer's single .30 flexible gun; self-sealing fuel tanks. POP: 87 [2102/2188].

  Douglas SBD (Douglas)
  Douglas SBD-3 art (K O Eckland)

SBD-3 1941 = 1000hp R-1820-52; twin .30 rear guns; length: 36'8" load: 4055# v: 250/152/x range: 1580 ceiling: 27,100'. POP: 584 [4518/4691, 03185/03384, 06492/06701].

SBD-3A 1942 = Modification and transfer from USN to USAAF as A-24; POP: 90.
  Douglas SBD-4 (USN)

SBD-4 1942 = POP: 780 [06702/06991, 10317/10806].

  Douglas SBD-5 Echelon formation, sort-of (USN)

SBD-5 1943 = Main production version; 1200hp R-1820-60; length: 33'0" load: 4167# v: 252/140/x range: 1565 ceiling: 24,500'. POP: 2965 [10807/11066, 28059/29213, 35922/36421, 36433/36932, 54050/54599].

SBD-6 1944 = 1350hp R-1820-66; load: 4328# v: 262/143/x range: 1700 ceiling: 28,600'. POP: 450 [54600/55049].


  Douglas XSB2D-1 (Clark Scott coll)

SB2D 1943 = 2pClwM rg; 2300hp Wright R-3350; span: 45'0" length: 38'7" load: 5680# v: 346/180/x range: 1480; ff: 3/x/43. POP: 2 as XSB2D-1 [03551/3552]. Evolved into single-seat BTD.
  Douglas SDW-1 (Douglas via John K Lewis coll)

SDW 1924 = Conversion of L-W-F DT-2 as long-range scout with larger fuselage and fuel tanks. POP: 3 as SDW-1 [A6593, A6596/6597].
T-30 SEE BT-30.
T2D - USN 3pOB and OBF torpedo-bomber development of Naval Aircraft Factory XTN-1. Redesignated P2D.
XT2D-1 1927 = Two 525hp Wright R-1750; span: 57'0" length: 44'10" load: 4325# v: 124/x/58 range: (land) 596 (sea) 587; ff: 1/27/27. POP: 3 [A7051/7053].

  Douglas T2D-1 (Gene Palmer coll)

T2D-1 1928 = Landplane and folding-wing seaplane versions; length: (land) 42'0" (sea) 44'4" load: 3975# v: 125 range: (land) 457 (sea) 384 ceiling: (land) 13,830' (sea) 11,400'. POP: 9 [A7587/7595], plus 18 with cowled 575hp Wright R-1820Es delivered as P2D-1 land and sea versions in mid-1930 [A8644/8661]; length: 43'11" load: 5167# v: 135/108/62 range: 1010.


T3D - USN torpedo bomber.
  Douglas XT3D-1 [A-8730] (Clark Scott coll)

XT3D-1 1931 = 3pOB with 575hp P&W S2B1; span: 50'0" length: 35'4" load: 3620# v: 122 range: 560 ceiling: 14,400'. POP: 1 [A8730].

  Douglas XT3D-2 [A-8730] (Navy League)
  Douglas XT3D-2 [A-8730] (Clark Scott coll)

XT3D-2 1933 = 3pCB with 800hp P&W XR-1830, wheel pants; length: 36'6" v: 142 range: 780 ceiling: 13,800'. POP: 1 converted from XT3D-1.


  Douglas XTB2D-1 (Dan Shumaker coll)

TB2D Devastator II, Skypirate 1945 = 3-4pClwM rg; 3000hp P&W XR-4360-8 with four-blade contrarotating props; span: 70'0" length: 46'0" load: 10,140# v: 247/141/75 range: 1450 ceiling: 19,000'; ff: 3/18/45. Tricycle gear. POP: 2 as XTB2D-1 [36933/36934] prototypes. Larger, faster, and heavier than a B-25, and with twice the offensive load of a TBM, but coming as it did at the end of hostilities, production contract for 23 was cancelled.
TBD Devastator - Torpedo bomber. Leland Atwood et al. The first monoplane selected for carrier duty suffered heavy losses early in WW2 and was pulled from duty in 1942.
  Douglas XTBD-1 (USN)

XTBD-1 1935 = 2pClwM rg; P&W 800hp XR-1830; v: 205/188/63; ff: 4/15/35. POP: 1 [9270].

  Douglas TBD-1 (USN)
  Douglas TBD-1 (USN)

TBD-1 1937 = 2pClwM rg; 850hp P&W R-1830-64; span: 50'0" length: 35'0" v: 206/192/69 range: 716 ceiling: 19,700' POP: 129 [0268/0381.

  Douglas TBD-1A [0268] (Andrew Seybel coll)

TBD-1A 1939 = First TBD-1 refitted with experimental twin floats [0268].

UC-67 SEE B-23.
VTB - Proposed carrier-based torpedo-bomber in 1938 to replace TBD. Paper design only, no mock-up built.
  Weilandcraft (Douglas via Bruce Cunningham coll)

Weilandcraft 1964 = 2pOFb; two 275hp unspecified tractors on pylons; span (beam): 32'0" length: 52'0". Carl Weiland. Primarily wooden construction, the catamaran hydrofoil design was proposed by Swiss inventor Weiland to Douglas Co as a large-load transport that would "fly" in ground-affect more economically and at greater speeds (v est: 115) than surface vessels. After many water tests (photo background suggests Long Beach harbor), on 3/4/64 at about 75 mph, the nose lifted the front skis, then the rear skis broke free, so it apparently flew to some extent. Its flight, however, ended abruptly after the nose continued to rise despite reduction on power—performing like some flat-bottom speedboats do before they flip? It reads like a stall occurred instead and the craft hit the water nose-high hard enough to pretty much disassemble it. Further development was dropped. A comprehensive, illustrated article by Bruce Cunningham about this rarity was in the Spring 2007 issue (52/1) of AAHS Journal.
  Douglas X-3 [49-2892] (USAF)
  Douglas X-3 [49-2892] (Clark Scott)

X-3, XS-3 Stiletto 1952 = Supersonic research aircraft to collect data on thermodynamic heating at high-altitudes; two J34-WE-17; ff: 10/20/52 (p: William Bridgeman), but it made an unofficial lift-off during high-speed taxi tests on 10/15/52. 51 flights through mid-1956. Original designation was XS-3. Originally scheduled for more powerful J46 engines to crack the Mach 2 barrier, it was so underpowered that it could only attain Mach 1 in a power dive. POP: 1 as X-3 [49-2892]. Another was in progress when the contract was cancelled.
XO-27 SEE B-7.
YO-44, YOA-5 SEE B-11.
<—  Douglas A thru C

SOURCES:
-- Legacy of Leadership[TWA c.1970]
-- McDonnell Douglas Aircraft Since 1920,René J Francillon [Naval Institute Press 1979, 1988]
-- US Navy Aircraft 1921-1941William T Larkins [Aviation History 1961]

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